Expert working group (previous edition)

Professor John Seymour (Chair), Director, Department of Haematology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and The Royal Melbourne Hospital Dr Phillip Campbell, Head of Haematology, Barwon Health Dr Duncan Carradice, Haematologist, Western Health Dr Geoff Chong, Medical Oncologist, Austin Health, Ballarat Regional Integrated Cancer Centre Ms Tracey Dryden, National Lymphoma Coordinator, Leukaemia Foundation Ms Jane Farrow, Senior…

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Members of the multidisciplinary team for head and neck cancer (formerly Appendix E)

The multidisciplinary team may include the following members: Aboriginal health practitioner, Indigenous liaison officer or remote general practitioner care coordinator (as determined by multidisciplinary team members)* exercise physiologist fertility specialist haematologist/medical oncologist* nurse (with appropriate expertise)* pathologist* radiation oncologist* radiologist/imaging specialists* clinical trials coordinator dietitian exercise physiologist general practitioner nuclear medicine physician occupational therapist palliative…

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Expert working group (this edition)

Professor John Seymour (Chair), Haematologist, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre Dr Michael Dickinson, Haematologist, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre Ms Tracey Dryden, Nurse Consultant, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre Associate Professor Eliza Hawkes, Medical Oncologist, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Centre, Austin Health and Eastern Health Ms Helena Rodi, Project Manager, Advance Care Planning Australia Professor Robert Thomas, Special Advisor…

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Optimal Care Pathways Steering Committee

Alfred Health Cancer Australia Cancer Council Victoria, Strategy and Support Division Cancer Institute New South Wales Concord Repatriation General Hospital New South Wales Consumer representative Department of Health and Human, Health and Wellbeing Division Services, Cancer and Aged Care Unit National Cancer Expert Reference Group Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness and Research Centre St Vincent’s Hospital…

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Contributors and reviewers

Our thanks to the following health professionals, consumer representatives, stakeholders and organisations consulted in developing this optimal care pathway.

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Medical colleges and peak organisations invited to provide feedback

Advance Care Planning Australia Allied Health Professions Australia Australasian Association of Nuclear Medicine Specialists Australasian Chapter of Palliative Medicine, Royal Australia College of Physicians Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group Australian and New Zealand Society of Neuroradiology Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Care Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre Australian College of Nursing Australian Medical Association…

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Adolescents and young adults

In recent years, adolescent and young adult oncology has emerged as a distinct field due to lack of progress in survival and quality-of-life outcomes (Ferrari et al. 2010; Smith et al. 2013). The significant developmental change that occurs during this life stage complicates a diagnosis of cancer, often leading to unique physical, social and emotional…

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Statement of acknowledgement

We acknowledge the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to the land, sea and community. We pay our respects to them and their cultures and to Elders past, present and emerging. This work is available from the Cancer Council website. First published in May 2015. This edition published in June 2021.…

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Paediatrics

The rarity and complexity of childhood cancer provides a real challenge in delivering optimal care. Despite overall survival rates of more than 80 per cent (Cancer Australia 2015b), treatments for paediatric cancer are often prolonged and complicated and have a narrow therapeutic index. High-quality evidence-based care is required not only to deliver therapy and supportive…

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Appendix D: Complementary therapies

Complementary therapies may be used together with conventional medical treatments to support and enhance quality of life and wellbeing. They do not aim to cure the patient’s cancer. Instead, they are used to help control symptoms such as pain and fatigue (Cancer Council Australia 2019). The lead clinician or health professional involved in the patient’s…

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