2.4.2 Communication with patients, carers and families

The general practitioner is responsible for: providing patients with information that clearly describes to whom they are being referred, the reason for referral and the expected timeframes for appointments requesting that patients notify them if the specialist has not been in contact within the expected timeframe considering referral options for patients living rurally or remotely…

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5.4.4 Communication with the general practitioner

The lead clinician should ensure regular, timely, two-way communication with the general practitioner about: the patient’s progress the follow-up care plan potential late effects supportive and palliative care requirements any shared care arrangements clarification of various roles in patient care a process for rapid re-entry to medical services for patients with suspected recurrence or if…

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5.4.1 Supportive care

See validated screening tools mentioned in Principle 4 ‘Supportive care’. Additionally, the ‘Cancer Survivors Unmet Needs (CaSun)’ is another validated screening tool that may help health professionals to identify the unmet needs of patients during survivorship. A number of specific challenges and needs may arise for cancer survivors: emotional distress arising from fear of disease…

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6.8.1 Supportive care

See validated screening tools mentioned in Principle 4 ‘Supportive care’. A number of specific challenges and needs may arise at this time for patients: assistance for dealing with emotional and psychological distress resulting from fear of death or dying, existential concerns, anticipatory grief, communicating wishes to loved ones, interpersonal problems and sexuality concerns potential isolation…

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7.3.1 Supportive care

See validated screening tools mentioned in Principle 4 ‘Supportive care’. A number of specific challenges and needs may arise for patients at this time: assistance for dealing with emotional and psychological distress from anticipatory grief, fear of death or dying, anxiety/depression and interpersonal problems management of physical symptoms including altered bowel function and incontinence stoma…

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6.8.2 Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation may be required at any point of the metastatic care pathway, from preparing for treatment through to palliative care. Issues that may need to be dealt with include managing cancer-related fatigue, improving physical endurance, achieving independence in daily tasks, returning to work and ongoing adjustment to cancer and its sequels. Exercise is a safe…

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7.3.2 Communication with patients, carers and families

The lead clinician is responsible for: being open to and encouraging discussion with the patient about the expected disease course, considering the patient’s personal and cultural beliefs and expectations discussing palliative care options, including inpatient and community-based services as well as dying at home and subsequent arrangements providing the patient and carer with the contact…

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6.8.3 Communication with patients, carers and families

The lead clinician should ensure there is adequate discussion with patients and carers about the diagnosis and recommended treatment, including treatment intent and possible outcomes, likely adverse effects and the supportive care options available. More information Refer to Principle 6 ‘Communication’ for communication skills training programs and resources.

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4.2.4 Targeted therapies and immunotherapy

4.2.4 Targeted therapies and immunotherapy There are several targeted therapies that may be used as part of treatment for colorectal cancer. These include bevacizumab and cetuximab, among others. They are only used for metastatic disease in conjunction with chemotherapy. There is a role for immunotherapy in selected metastatic cancer cases and currently only in microsatellite…

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4.2.5 Emerging therapies

4.2.5 Emerging therapies The key principle for precision medicine is prompt and clinically oriented communication and coordination with an accredited laboratory and pathologist. Tissue analysis is integral for access to emerging therapies and, as such, tissue specimens should be treated carefully to enable additional histopathological or molecular diagnostic tests in certain scenarios. There is an…

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