5.2.1 Treatment summary

After initial treatment, the woman, the woman’s nominated carer (as appropriate) and general practitioner should receive a treatment summary outlining: the diagnostic tests performed and results tumour characteristics the type and date of treatment(s) interventions and treatment plans from other health professionals supportive care services provided contact information for key care providers.

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4.7.3 Communication with the general practitioner

The lead clinician should: discuss with the general practitioner their role in symptom management, psychosocial care and referral to local services ensure regular and timely two-way communication regarding: the treatment plan, including intent and potential side effects supportive and palliative care requirements the woman’s prognosis and their understanding of this enrolment in research and/or clinical…

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7.3.1 Supportive care

Screening, assessment and referral to appropriate health professionals is required to meet the identified needs of the woman, her carer and family. In addition to the common issues identified in the Appendix, specific issues that may arise at this time include: emotional and psychological distress from anticipatory grief, fear of death/dying, anxiety/ depression, interpersonal problems…

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4.7.2 Communication with the patient, carer and family

The lead clinician should: discuss the treatment plan with the woman and carer, including the intent of treatment and expected outcomes, and provide a written plan provide the woman and carer with information on the possible side effects of treatment, self-management strategies and emergency contacts initiate a discussion regarding advance care planning with the woman…

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7.3.2 Communication with the patient, carer and family

The lead clinician should: be open to and encourage discussion about the expected disease course, with due consideration to personal and cultural beliefs and expectations discuss palliative care options including inpatient and community-based services as well as dying at home and subsequent arrangements provide the woman and her carer with the contact details of a…

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7.3.3 Communication with the general practitioner

The lead clinician should discuss end-of-life care planning and transition planning to ensure the woman’s needs and goals are addressed in the appropriate environment. The woman’s general practitioner should be kept fully informed and involved in major developments in the woman’s illness trajectory.

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6.6.1 Supportive care

Screening, assessment and referral to appropriate health professionals is required to meet the identified needs of an individual, their carer and family. In addition to the common issues outlined in the Appendix, specific issues that may arise include: emotional and psychological distress resulting from fear of death/dying, existential concerns, anticipatory grief, communicating wishes to loved…

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6.6.2 Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation may be required at any point of the care pathway from preparing for treatment through to disease-free survival and palliative care. Issues that may need to be addressed include managing cancer-related fatigue, cognitive changes, improving physical endurance, achieving independence in daily tasks, returning to work and ongoing adjustment to disease and its sequelae.

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5.2.2 Follow-up care

Responsibility for follow-up care should be agreed between the lead clinician, the general practitioner, relevant members of the multidisciplinary team and the woman, with an agreed plan documented that outlines: what medical follow-up is required (surveillance for cancer spread, recurrence or secondary cancers, screening and assessment for medical and psychosocial effects) care plans from other…

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6.6.3 Communication with the patient, carer and family

The lead clinician should ensure there is adequate discussion with the woman and her carer about the diagnosis and recommended treatment, including the intent of treatment and possible outcomes, likely adverse effects and supportive care options available.

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